Cells are classified by their morphological, phenotypic, and functional differences. For example, the immune system is composed of a complex network of cells and tissues that work together to defend against infection and other diseases, like cancer. Explore our cell type webpages to learn more about neuro, immune, and stem cells. Learn about their development and function and find a diverse portfolio of expertly-crafted products to identify and characterize each of them.

 

Looking for phenotyping markers? Explore our cell markers and essential markers for immunophenotyping pages.

B Cells

B cells are lymphocytes that are responsible for antibody production and producing cytokines that regulate the response of other immune cells. On our webpage, you can learn more about B cell development, find phenotyping markers, and understand antibody production.

 

Learn about B cells >

T Helper Cells

CD4+ T helper cells orchestrate the adaptive immune response. While they lack the capacity to directly kill or engulf pathogens, they activate and regulate effector cell function. Learn more about T helper cell subtypes and find a diverse portfolio of products to detect and characterize each subtype.

 

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T Regulatory Cells

T regulatory cells, also known as Tregs, are essential in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Understanding these cells is critical for a number of research areas, including autoimmune disorders, tolerance to transplantation, and immune activity against cancer cells. Visit our Treg webpage to learn about important cell markers, activation, and developmental pathways.

 

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Th17 Cells

Th17 cells are a subset of activated T helper cells that mediate an immune response against extracellular bacteria and fungi. Check out our Th17 webpage to learn about Th17-associated cytokines, phenotyping markers, plasticity, and related pathways.

 

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γδ T Cells

T cell receptor (TCR) diversity is generated by rearrangement of gene segments. γδ T cells are a small subset of T cells that express a unique TCR. While they are less common than other T cells subsets, they are found abundantly in the gut mucosa. Learn more about these unique cells, the nomenclature used to describe them, and their related pathways on our γδ T Cells page.

 

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Natural Killer Cells

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a vital arm of innate immunity because they possess cytolytic functions in the absence of specific immunization. NK cells also participate in surveillance against viral infection and tumor cells. Read our NK cell web page to learn more about their functions and find products to study NK cell activation and inhibition receptors.

 

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Natural Killer T Cells

Natural Killer T (NKT) cells have a combination of T cell and NK cell attributes, including their phenotyping markers. These unique cells express a T cell receptor and produce T cell related cytokines, but are activated by CD1d and lipids, rather than MHC presented-peptides. Visit our NKT cell page to learn more about their classification, activation, and development.

 

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B Cells

B cells are lymphocytes that are responsible for antibody production and producing cytokines that regulate the response of other immune cells. On our webpage, you can learn more about B cell development, find phenotyping markers, and understand antibody production.

 

Learn about B cells >

T Helper Cells

CD4+ T helper cells orchestrate the adaptive immune response. While they lack the capacity to directly kill or engulf pathogens, they activate and regulate effector cell function. Learn more about T helper cell subtypes and find a diverse portfolio of products to detect and characterize each subtype.

 

Learn about T helper cells >

T Regulatory Cells

T regulatory cells, also known as Tregs, are essential in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Understanding these cells is critical for a number of research areas, including autoimmune disorders, tolerance to transplantation, and immune activity against cancer cells. Visit our Treg webpage to learn about important cell markers, activation, and developmental pathways.

 

Learn about T regulatory cells >

Th17 Cells

Th17 cells are a subset of activated T helper cells that mediate an immune response against extracellular bacteria and fungi. Check out our Th17 webpage to learn about Th17-associated cytokines, phenotyping markers, plasticity, and related pathways.

 

Learn about Th17 cells >

γδ T Cells

T cell receptor (TCR) diversity is generated by rearrangement of gene segments. γδ T cells are a small subset of T cells that express a unique TCR. While they are less common than other T cells subsets, they are found abundantly in the gut mucosa. Learn more about these unique cells, the nomenclature used to describe them, and their related pathways on our γδ T Cells page.

 

Learn about γδ T cells > 

Natural Killer Cells

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a vital arm of innate immunity because they possess cytolytic functions in the absence of specific immunization. NK cells also participate in surveillance against viral infection and tumor cells. Read our NK cell web page to learn more about their functions and find products to study NK cell activation and inhibition receptors.

 

Learn about NK cells >

Natural Killer T Cells

Natural Killer T (NKT) cells have a combination of T cell and NK cell attributes, including their phenotyping markers. These unique cells express a T cell receptor and produce T cell related cytokines, but are activated by CD1d and lipids, rather than MHC presented-peptides. Visit our NKT cell page to learn more about their classification, activation, and development.

 

Learn about NKT cells >

Dendritic Cells

Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen-presenting cells and are critical for the initiation and control of the lymphocyte response. Check out our DC webpage to find products to characterize DC cell subsets and learn about their maturation and function.

 

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Macrophages

Macrophages are an important part of the mononuclear phagocytic system. Like dendritic cells, macrophages have antigen presentation capabilities, but are primarily involved in pathogen killing and wound and tissue repair. Visit our macrophage page to learn about their development and function, and find cell markers for phenotyping.

 

Learn about macrophages >

Monocytes

Monocytes are circulating white blood cells with the potential to differentiate into tissue macrophages and dendritic cells. They also mediate anti-microbial defense and are implicated in inflammatory diseases. Understand how they develop and patrol the body and find reagents to study these cells on our monocyte page.

 

Learn about monocytes >

Neurons

Neurons have highly compartmentalized structures that allow them to be distinguished from other cell types. These are generally classified as the soma or cell body, axon, dendrite, and synapse. Visit our neuronal cells markers page to learn more about how to use microscopy to distinguish them other cell types.

 

Learn about neurons >

Microglia

Microglia reside in the central nervous system and are recognized for their role in synapse remodeling and maturation, maintenance of homeostasis, and involvement in degenerative diseases. Find reagents to study microglia and learn more about their roles in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

 

Learn about microglia >

Oligodendrocytes

Oligodendrocytes are glial cells that product myelin sheath and enable signal transduction for the propagation of action potentials along axons. Understand oligodendrocyte development, their role in disease, and find products to study these cells.

 

Learn about oligodendrocytes >

Astrocytes

Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell type in the brain. They have important functions, including neurotransmitter uptake and release, modulation of synaptic transmission, and nervous system repair. Learn more about their function, markers used to detect them, and their involvement with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and autism spectrum disorders.

 

Learn about astrocytes >

Innate Lymphoid Cells

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are the innate immune system’s counterparts to T helper cells. While these cells share similar functions with Th cells, they do not share similar surface markers. Understand how these unique cells develop and learn more about how they are classified into distinct subtypes.

 

Learn about innate lymphoid cells >

Stromal Cells

Stromal cells make up the connective tissue of all organs to provide the architecture for the support of other cells. However, they also function as part of the immune response by presenting antigens, responding to pathogens, and educating the functional responses of other cells. Learn more about the role of stromal cells in immunology and find cell markers and products to study them.

 

Learn about stromal immunology >

Stem Cells

Stem cells are unique cells due to their capability to limitlessly self-renew and differentiate into other cell types. Visit our stem cell page to find reagents to isolate, proliferate, and characterize stem and progenitor cells.

 

Learn about stem cells >

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